Solo & Chamber Ensemble, Instrumental

Living is easy with eyes closed (2017)

for twelve strings and electronics

Premiered April 19, 2017, by Quodlibet Ensemble, Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church, New York, NY

Living is easy with eyes closed was commissioned by Quodlibet Ensemble.

Through the Panic (2016)

for solo cello

Premiered December 6, 2016, by Mihai Marica, Harris Theater, Chicago, IL

The Way Things Work (2016)

for violin and cello

Premiered October 21, 2016, by Karen Kim, violin, and Michael Nicolas, cello, St. Barthlomew's Church, New York, NY

Karen Kim, violin; Michael Nicolas, cello // October 21, 2016, St. Barthlomew's Church, New York, NY

Composer's Note
The Way Things Work, for violin and cello, takes its title from a poem by Jorie Graham, who suggests that the way things work “is by admitting / or opening away. … by solution, / resistance lessened or / increased and taken / advantage of. … The way things work / is that eventually / something catches.” It seems to me the practice of composition—like, I imagine, any creative endeavour; or, indeed, any worthwhile endeavour, creative or otherwise—follows these same prescriptions. But there’s more: there’s intention: “I believe in you, / cylinder lock, pully… your head is the horizon to / my hand.” The Way Things Work was composed as my wife, Karen, entered the third trimester of her pregnancy. During this time, considering the way things work has suddenly felt a profound responsibility. (Incidentally, Jorie Graham has of late become our regular bedtime reading; all the books and websites encourage reading to your child in utero.)

To Hear You Tell It (2016)

for flute, violin, cello, and percussion

Premiered June 8, 2016, by Cadillac Moon Ensemble, DiMenna Center for Classical Music, New York, NY

Cadillac Moon Ensemble // June 8, 2016, DiMenna Center for Classical Music, New York, NY

Commissioned by Cadillac Moon Ensemble.

Composer's Note
I’ve been reading a lot of Nabokov lately—he of the notoriously unreliable narrators (as in Pale Fire; Ada, or Ardor; Lolita, of course). Such a wondrous thing happens in these storytellers’ storytelling. A narrative fantastically emerges outside of the story being told. The reader is invited to step back from the ostensible story and, like viewing one of those Magic Eye images, discovers the novel’s truth.

Our interaction with time—a narrative in its own way, and music’s vital force—is similarly unreliable: time is a seeming constant, but slippery in how we mark it. Our memories fail us. Time “stands still.” Twice a year, we savagely bend it to our will, adjusting our clocks by an hour. Etc.

The comfort of music, of course, is that its marking of time is steadfast (this piece is about fourteen minutes long). And, of course, it can always be trusted.

like the tide... (2016)

for three flutes (flute, flute/alto flute, flute/bass flute)

Premiered April 15, 2016, by Areon Flutes, Center for New Music, San Francisco, CA

Areon Flutes // April 15, 2016, Center for New Music, San Francisco, CA

Composer's Note
In the conception of this work, sections were thought of in descriptive terms—in turn, and to varying degrees, technical and poetical—which it might be informative to share: Introit – meccanico – in which motivic figures emerge – flight (fancy free) – waterfall music – recap [of meccanico] – like the tide washing upon the shore, then receding back into the sea. These were inevitably corrupted over the course of the work’s realization. While writing, I had in mind various images: one was, indeed, the rising and falling of the tide; another was the evolutionary emergence of life from the ocean, and a return to the ocean. (I was subsequently reminded of this line from a Björk song, which I love: “Your sweat is salty. I am why.”)

Incident (2015)

for violin and piano

Premiered July 10, 2015, by Karen Kim, violin, and Andrew Armstrong, piano, Green Lake Music Festival, Thelma Sadoff Center for the Arts, Fond du Lac, WI

Karen Kim, violin; Orion Weiss, piano // May 3, 2016, National Sawdust, Brooklyn, NY

Composer's Note
Incident for violin and piano is the third of my Incidents (following one for cello and piano and another for string quartet). These are instrumental chamber works that probe singular abstractions from within a deliberately narrative framework. An incident is something that happens (a spilled drink, an argument, a car crash); any incident, when deeply considered, may reveal some underlying truth (gravity, impatience) beyond its superficial details. My Incidents forgo the car crashes and spilled drinks, aiming immediately for the underlying phenomena. Mendelssohn wrote Songs without Words; these are Stories without Plots. The principle concerns of Incident for violin and piano are memory and elasticity: each a thing that may be tried to a breaking point. The work is dedicated to Karen Kim, my favorite violinist and favorite wife.

Dreamers often lie (2014)

for violin, spoken word, and electronics

Premiered April 25, 2014, by Kristin Lee, violin, and Patrick Castillo, spoken word and electronics, World Café Live, Philadelphia, PA

Kristin Lee, violin; Patrick Castillo, spoken word and electronics // April 27, 2014, (Le) Poisson Rouge, New York, NY

Dreamers often lie was commissioned by the Metropolis Ensemble for violinist Kristin Lee.

Program Note
ROMEO
And we mean well in going to this mask;
But 'tis no wit to go.

MERCUTIO
Why, may one ask?

ROMEO
I dream'd a dream to-night.

MERCUTIO
And so did I.

ROMEO
Well, what was yours?

MERCUTIO
That dreamers often lie.

ROMEO
In bed asleep, while they do dream things true.

(Romeo and Juliet, I.iv.48–52)

Music for the Third Place (2012)

for violin and electronics

Premiered September 15, 2012, by Karen Kim, violin, and Patrick Castillo, electronics, The Third Place Gallery, Minneapolis, MN

Karen Kim, violin; Patrick Castillo, electronics // September 15, 2012, The Third Place Gallery, Minneapolis, MN

Music for the Third Place is an aleatoric work for violin and electronics comprising pre-composed fragments, found sounds, field recordings, synthesizers, and live audio processing systems. The shape of the work is governed by a set of rules in the style of competitive board games and the players’ choices in accordance with those rules. Aside from the content of the violin fragments, found sounds, and field recordings, nothing is pre-determined.

This is a recording of the world premiere performance (first of two readings) at the Third Place Gallery in Minneapolis, for which the site-specific work was composed. In addition to the violin fragments and electronic components, a variety of bells - collected from antique shops in St. Paul, Stillwater, and elsewhere - were distributed among the audience: listeners were invited to to ring bells whenever they heard something they liked or did not like, thus contributing to the overall soundscape of the performance.

Introit and Incident (2011)

for string quartet

Incident (2010)

for cello and piano

Premiered January 19, 2011, by Dmitri Atapine, cello, and Adela H Park, piano, Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concerts, Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL

Dmitri Atapine, cello; Adela H Park, piano // August 1, 2011, Music@Menlo, Atherton, CA

Composer's Note
This short movement for cello and piano is a study in the expressive potential of seemingly impassive musical materials: repeated notes, juxtaposed half steps and whole steps, and the all-trichord hexachord among others. The work comprises three distinct sections unified by these devices. In the first section, an introductory dialogue between the indifferent cello and quick piano figurations gives way to a lyrical melody with introspective piano accompaniment. The climactic cello monody follows. The apparent tranquility of the closing section, poco meno mosso, belies a remaining anxiety from the preceding music.

Two Pieces after Grass (2009)

for tenor saxophone and sampler

Premiered April 18, 2009, by David Castillo, tenor saxophone, Connecticut College, New London, CT

Ed RosenBerg III, tenor saxophone; Patrick Castillo, sampler // May 8, 2015, IBeam Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY

Cirque (2006)

for solo violin

Premiered May 7, 2007, by Piotr Szewczyk, violin, University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI

Karen Kim, violin

The Quality of Mercy (Innova 926): http://www.innova.mu/albums/patrick-castillo/quality-mercy

Lola (2001, rev. 2004)

for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano

Premiered May 6, 2005, by Andrea Fisher, flute; Pascal Archer, clarinet; Jessie Montgomery, violin; Claire Bryant, cello; and Ching-Wen Hsiao, piano, St. Luke's Lutheran Church, New York, NY

Mvts. I–IV: Andrea Fisher, flute; Pascal Archer, clarinet; Yaniv Segal, violin; Laura Usiskin, cello; Barbara Podgurski, piano // V: Andrea Fisher, flute; Pascal Archer, clarinet; Jessie Montgomery, violin; Claire Bryant, cello; Ching-Wen Hsiao, piano // May 6, 2005, St. Luke's Lutheran Church, New York, NY

Recipient of the Brian M. Israel Prize (Society for New Music, Syracuse, NY)